12-Mar-2013

About Us

Welcome to www.DriversWindows8.com

Driverswindows8.com is an information site which help you to get right driver for your PC by giving you the company site link to download drivers.

We do not host any drivers on out site.

About Windows 8

Windows 8 can be installed on the same hardware that powers Windows Vista and Windows 7. Windows 8 works great on tablet computers and Windows had held devices.. Windows 8 was designed with Windows 7 apps in mind so in most cases you do not have to upgrade your favorite application.

In addition to the new look of the Start Screen, Windows 8 incorporates the desktop view that you are most familiar with in addition to the “Metro” look.

Built into Windows 8 is the Windows Store. In the Windows store you can search and browse apps. The store is organized in categories. There is a section for highlighted apps as well as the most frequently downloaded apps. In most cases you can try an app before you buy it. There are many FREE apps available in the Windows store.

Windows 8 works best with touch devices however it works great on conventional PC’s and Laptop computers

There are 3 versions of Windows 8 to choose from and depending on which version of Windows 7 you have you can upgrade to a specific version of Windows 8.The 3 versions of Windows 8 are:

You can upgrade to Windows 8 and keep Windows settings, personal files, and applications from the following Windows operating system editions:

Windows 7 Starter

Windows 7 Home Basic

Windows 7 Home Premium

Note: If you do not care to keep your previous version of Windows settings, personal files and applications you can chose to perform a “clean install”. During a clean install Windows will save your old windows documents and files into a directory named “windows.old” and create a new Windows folder structure. If you select this option you will have to re-install all of your previously installed applications including Microsoft Office. Hopfully you saved your application software install media and license key’s otherwise you won’t be able to install them.

Windows 8 Pro

You can upgrade to Windows 8 Pro and keep Windows settings, personal files, and applications from the following Windows operating system editions:

Windows 7 Starter

Windows 7 Home Basic

Windows 7 Home Premium

Windows 7 Professional

Windows 7 Ultimate

Note: If you do not care to keep your previous version of Windows settings, personal files and applications you can chose to perform a “clean install”. During a clean install Windows will save your old windows documents and files into a directory named “windows.old” and create a new Windows folder structure. If you select this option you will have to re-install all of your previously installed applications including Microsoft Office. Hopefully you saved your application software install media and license key’s otherwise you won’t be able to install them

Windows Enterprise

You can upgrade to Windows 8 Enterprise (Volume License) from the following operating system editions:

Windows 7 Professional (Volume License)

Windows 7 Enterprise (Volume License)

Windows 8 (Volume License)

Note: If you do not care to keep your previous version of Windows settings, personal files and applications you can chose to perform a “clean install”. During a clean install Windows will save your old windows documents and files into a directory named “windows.old” and create a new Windows folder structure. If you select this option you will have to re-install all of your previously installed applications including Microsoft Office. Hopefully you saved your application software install media and license key’s otherwise you won’t be able to install them.

Update a driver for hardware that isn't working properly

If you have a hardware device that isn't functioning properly, or you're installing a program or game that states it requires newer drivers than you currently have installed, you should check Windows Update for updated drivers. You might also want to set Windows Update to check automatically for recommended driver updates.

A third option is to manually update drivers for a device from our website www.driverswindows8.com

Hardware Tools

The right tool, combined with the right knowledge, will enable you, the not-so-computer-expert, to fix just about any problem you might have.

Here you'll find lists and reviews of hardware testing devices, information on buying the right computer screwdriver toolkit, tutorials on testing important parts of your computer, and much more

Why is this site here?

This site was created due to the immense lack of support for a technician to find the proper hardware drivers in a timely manner. A technician could spend hours or days tracking down a specific driver for a Windows oprating system and sometimes not even find anything. Compound this problem with manufacturers that would shut down their companies after releasing hardware and drivers that were poorly marketed, add in the fact that sometimes a site is down for maintenance for a day or more. When you need a driver, you need it now. Not when a site comes back online to download it from.

I am asked a lot why this site is free.

I believe that technicians have enough stress in their life just repairing computers. There is enough time wasted attempting to resolve issue in computers, to add to the stress of tracking down the right driver, and then demanding a fee to point you to where it is actually located is just not moral.

What drivers can I find here?

You can find drivers here for Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98,Windows ME, Windows 2000,Windows, Windows 2003 XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8(Both 32 bit and 64 bit versions)

Drivers and information

Windows can find and download two kinds of updates for devices connected to your computer:

Drivers

A driver is software that allows your computer to communicate with hardware devices. Without drivers, the devices you connect to your computer—for example, a mouse or external hard drive—won't work properly. Windows can automatically check if there are drivers available for new devices that you connect to your computer.

For hardware that you've connected to your computer in the past, updated drivers might become available at a later date; but those drivers aren't installed automatically. To install these optional updates, go to Windows Update in Control Panel, check for updates, and then view and install driver updates that are available for your computer.

Information

Windows can download high-resolution icons for many hardware devices that you connect to your computer, along with detailed information about them, such as product name, manufacturer, and model number—even detailed information about the sync capabilities of a device. These details can make it easier for you to distinguish between similar devices that are connected to your computer, such as different mobile phones.

Device Manager:

Device Manager is an extension of the Microsoft Management Console that provides a central and organized view of all the Microsoft Windows recognized hardware installed in a computer

Device Manager is used for:

The Device Manager is a Control Panel applet in Microsoft Windows operating systems. It allows users to view and control the hardware attached to the computer. When a piece of hardware is not working, the offending hardware is highlighted for the user to deal with. The list of hardware can be sorted by various criteria.

For each device, users can:

Supply device drivers

Enable or disable devices

Tell Windows to ignore malfunctioning devices

View other technical properties

Device Manager was introduced with Windows 95 and later added to Windows 2000. In NT-based versions, it is included as a Microsoft Management Console snap-in.

Error Codes

Device Manager error codes are numerical codes, accompanied by an error message, that help users determine what kind of issue Windows is having with a piece of hardware.Device Manager is an OS feature that lets you view and change the properties of all devices attached to your computer.

To get to the device manager in Windows, right click on the My computer icon, choose properties, then click on the device manager tab. From there you can select a variety of management options.

The device manager is found in both Windows (95 and higher) and MacintoshPC platforms. Windows2000 contains an improved device manager that detects plug-and-play hardware and displays a large list of supported hardware.

Using Device Manager to Uninstall Devices and Driver Packages

Device Manager is a Control Panel application that allows you to manage devices and drivers on your system. You can use Device Manager to uninstall devices and driver packages with some limitations. Typically, an end-user does not use Device Manager to uninstall devices or driver packages, but might have to use Device Manager to troubleshoot problems they might encounter on their computer.

Note You must have administrator privileges to uninstall a device or driver package by using Device Manager.

For more information about uninstalling driver and driver packages, see How Devices and Driver Packages are Uninstalled.

Uninstalling the DeviceTo uninstall a device by using Device Manager, follow these steps:

Start Control Panel, click Hardware and Sound, and then click Device Manager.

Expand the node that represents the type of device that you want to uninstall, right-click the device entry, and clickUninstall.

On the Confirm Device Removal dialog box, click OK to start the uninstall process.

When the uninstall process is complete, remove the device.

Note With some devices, you might have to restart the system to complete the uninstall process. The device might continue to function until the system has been restarted.

Deleting a Driver Package from the Driver Store

On the Confirm Device Removal dialog box, click the Delete the driver software for this device option to delete the driver package that was used for the device.

Deleting the Binary Files of the Installed Driver

Device Manager cannot be used to perform this action.

Windows 8: All the information you'll need

The age of Windows 8 has dawned. It’s time to get to grips with a rather different PC operating system and there’s quite a lot to consider. It might be that you need some Windows 8 help; a glance at the best Windows 8 laptops, tablets and hybrid machines; or perhaps you’re just after the secrets to the Windows 8 upgrade program. Whatever it is you need that’s Windows 8 related, we’ve got it all here on Pocket-lint - including, of course, an in-depth and thorough Windows 8 review.

Windows 8 review

Windows 8 review

First things first. You might want to check that you want to buy Windows 8. It’s not going to be for everyone. There’s a whole new front-end user interface to get used to and the Start menu has completely disappeared from the desktop. Want to know more? Read this:

How to get Windows 8

So you want to be using Windows 8. The next step is getting it. There are a few different ways to make that happen - you can buy it fresh, you can upgrade to Windows 8, and then, of course, there’s the matter of just which version of Windows 8 you’re supposed to buy. Don’t forget about Windows RT. What, you don’t know what Windows RT is? Read this lot below for the required education:

Windows 8: Which edition is for me?

How do I upgrade to Windows 8?

What is Windows RT?

Windows 8 computers & accessories

You can buy yourself a copy of the Windows 8 software - either as an upgrade from Windows 7, Vista or XP - or you can just say to hell with it, accept that you could probably do with a new computer anyway and buy yourself a machine with Windows 8 pre-installed.

While Windows laptops have been de rigueur for a couple of years now, the touch-sensitive Windows 8 Modern UI has added a different dimension to your hardware choices. Suddenly the idea of having a big screen or a laptop that also becomes a tablet is very appealing indeed. So here are the Windows 8 computers that we would recommend:

Best Windows 8 all-in-one desktop PCs

Best Windows RT tablets

Best Windows 8 hybrid laptops

Surface of Windows RT & Surface for Windows 8 Pro: what's the difference?

Windows 8 tips and more

Now you're up and running with Windows 8 on your computer, it's a question of getting the most out of the experience. We'll be adding more and more to this section of Windows 8 tips with everything from how to find the Control Panel on Windows 8 to how to install it on an enemy laptop.

Windows 8 tips for non-touch users

How to install Windows 8 on a Mac

Microsoft talks the future of Windows 8

Windows 8 ecosystem

Windows isn't all about the laptop. Microsoft is pushing the entire ecosystem with the arrival of Windows 8, so if you're looking to get even more out of it, it's time to start thinking Windows Phone and Xbox. Here's an idea of the kinds of things in which you might wish to get involved.

How to Install Drivers in Windows 8

By Andy Rathbone from Windows 8 For Dummies

Windows comes with an arsenal of drivers — software that lets Windows communicate with the gadgets you plug in to your PC. Normally, Windows 8 automatically recognizes your new part, and it simply works. Other times, Windows 8 heads to the Internet and fetches some automated instructions before finishing the job.

But occasionally, you’ll plug in something that’s either too new for Windows 8 to know about or too old for it to remember. Or perhaps something attached to your PC becomes cranky, and you see odd messages grumble about “needing a new driver.”

In these cases, it’s up to you to track down and install a Windows 8 driver for that part. The best drivers come with an installation program that automatically places the software in the right place, fixing the problem. The worst drivers leave all the grunt work up to you.

If Windows 8 doesn’t automatically recognize and install your newly attached piece of hardware — even after you restart your PC — follow these steps to locate and install a new driver:

Visit the part manufacturer’s website and download the latest Windows 8 driver.

You often find the manufacturer’s website stamped somewhere on the part’s box. If you can’t find it, search for the part manufacturer’s name on Google and locate its website.

Look in the website’s Support, Downloads, or Customer Service area. There, you usually need to enter your part’s name, its model number, and your computer’s operating system (Windows 8) before the website coughs up the driver.

No Windows 8 driver listed? Try downloading a Windows 7 or Windows Vista driver instead; they occasionally work just as well.

Run the driver’s installation program

Sometimes clicking your downloaded file makes its installation program jump into action, installing the driver for you. If so, you’re through. If not, head to Step 3.

If the downloaded file has a little zipper on the icon, right-click it and choose Extract All to unzip its contents into a new folder that contains the files. (Windows 8 names that new folder after the file you’ve unzipped, making it easy to relocate.)

Right-click in the screen’s bottom-left corner and choose Device Manager from the pop-up menu.

The Device Manager appears, listing an inventory of every part inside or attached to your computer. The problematic one will have a yellow exclamation point icon next to it.

Click your problematic device listed in the Device Manager window. Then click

Action from the Device Manager’s menu bar and choose Add Legacy Hardware from the drop-down menu.

The Add Hardware Wizard guides you through the steps of installing your new hardware and, if necessary, installing your new driver. Beware, though: This last-ditch method of reviving problematic parts can frustrate even experienced techies.

Avoid problems by keeping your drivers up-to-date. Even the ones packaged with newly bought parts are usually old. Visit the manufacturer’s website, download, and install the latest driver. Chances are good that it fixes problems earlier users had with the first set of drivers.

Problems with a newly installed driver? Head back to Device Manager, double-click the troublesome part’s name, and click the Driver tab on the Properties box. Keep your breathing steady. Then click the Roll Back Driver button. Windows 8 ditches the newly installed driver and returns to the previous driver.

Windows 8 Printer Drivers

Click the following links for more information about finding and installing the different types of Windows 8 drivers for your printer.

How do I find and install the latest Windows 8 drivers?

What are the different types of Windows 8 drivers?

Windows RT drivers

What types of Windows 8 drivers are available for my printer?

A word about third-party web sites offering printer drivers